Some good points.

Via BPR:

Former FBI deputy director Andrew McCabe wasted little time declaring that he was a victim after being fired late Friday, claiming that he was “singled out. He pointed to an “unrelenting assault” on his reputation, to include tweets from President Trump that have “exacerbated it all.”

But in building a case for himself, McCabe just made life a lot tough for former FBI director James Comey and Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

At least, that’s according to Jonathan Turley, professor of law at George Washington University Law School.

In an op-ed run Saturday by The Hill, Turley pointed to a line in McCabe’s statement criticizing his termination “that could be viewed as incriminating fired FBI director James Comey, not just in leaking sensitive information but also in lying to Congress.”

McCabe commented on leaking information to a former Wall Street Journal reporter about the investigation of Hillary Clinton and the Clinton Foundation, saying he was authorized to “share” the information and did so with the knowledge of “the director,” which would have been Comey at the time.

Turley explained why this is “problematic”:

If the “interaction” means leaking the information, then McCabe’s statement would seem to directly contradict statements Comey made in a May 2017 congressional hearing. Asked if he had “ever been an anonymous source in news reports about matters relating to the Trump investigation or the Clinton investigation” or whether he had “ever authorized someone else at the FBI to be an anonymous source in news reports about the Trump investigation or the Clinton investigation,” Comey replied “never” and “no.”

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