Stuck between a rock and a hard place.

Via Gatesone Europe:

German broadcaster Welt24 reports, that a few days ago, German politician Wolfgang Bosbach met a Christian Iraqi family in Nordrhein-Westphalia (his constituency), who had recently applied for asylum in Germany.

Bosbach heard them tell how they had fled their country for fear of jihadist violence. Eventually, they reached the part of their story, in which they filled in their asylum application, in one of the foreign offices of the German Federal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF). There, they faced a BAMF employee with a headscarf, who was going to decide whether or not they, Christians, would get protected status.

Last year, 97.000 Iraqis submitted an application for asylum in Germany. In January, 64.6% of Iraqi asylum applications were successful. The family that Bosbach met however, was rejected, and they told him they felt they were at a disadvantage because of the official who handled their case. Bosbach understood their reasoning:

“I understand the applicants’ concern that their application may not have been decided upon solely on objective and prejudice-free considerations, (…) when they are Christians telling a headscarf-wearing Muslima that they have suffered persecution by Muslims.”

To Bosbach, it doesn’t matter so much, whether or not the official in question really was prejudiced, but merely that “the applicants have reason to fear that their application might not be objectively decided.” And Bosbach is of the opinion that this fear

“is not entirely ungrounded. Therefore, I cannot understand, why only Muslims in BAMF get to decide whether or not Christians, who fled from radical Muslims, get the right to stay in the Federal Republic of Germany.”

The Ministery of Internal Affairs meanwhile, appears to agree with the BAMF. It simply does not consider the headscarf, unlike the Christian cross, to be “a religious symbol in and of itself.” Only in context can it have a comparable meaning. And even that is not considered a problem, as there is no law or regulation against the wearing of religious symbols by civil servants.

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