If they’re shocked by the abuse of the food stamps program, I can only imagine the outrage when they find out what EBT cards are being used for.

Via WaPo:

Kudos to The Post’s Eli Saslow for a vivid story in Sunday’s paper about the burgeoning federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and its impact on struggling Woonsocket, R.I. Because of the 2008-09 recession and new eligibility rules, SNAP enrollment has expanded to 47 million people, including a third of Woonsocket’s 40,000 residents. SNAP’s total cost in 2012 was $78 billion, triple the 2003 level.

I read Saslow’s story with mixed feelings: pride in a generous nation that spends such sums to fight hunger; shame that economic conditions make it necessary to do so; and worry about the long-term consequences of dependency on SNAP.

What really caught my attention, though, were the photographs that showed what some SNAP recipients bought with their government-funded debit cards: CheetosPuffs, a one-ounce handful of which contains 10 grams of fat; a box containing two dozen 12-ounce cans of Fanta Orange soda, each of which contains 44 grams of sugar; a carton of six-ounceCapri Sun drink pouches, each of which contains 16 grams of sugar.

In short, this immense nutrition program pays for a lot of stuff that is the opposite of nutritious.

I don’t blame the consumers, in the sense that their choices are entirely permissible under SNAP’s rules.

As the Agriculture Departmentexplains on its Web site, federal law “defines eligible food as any food or food product for home consumption” and excludes only “alcoholic beverages, tobacco products, hot food and any food sold for on-premises consumption,” as well as “pet foods, soaps, paper products, medicines and vitamins, household supplies, grooming items, and cosmetics.”

“Soft drinks, candy, cookies, snack crackers, and ice cream are food items and are therefore eligible items,” the USDA notes.

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