Precisely zero of you will be shocked to learn Obama formally endorsed leftist fruit loop Bill de Blasio for mayor of NYC.

(Reuters) – President Barack Obama on Monday threw his support behind New York mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio, lauding his fellow Democrat’s commitment to “an economy that works for all” and a “bold, courageous” plan to lift more New Yorkers out of poverty.

De Blasio, a liberal who has campaigned on the idea that America’s largest city should do more to address economic inequality, has a wide lead over Republican Joe Lhota, a deputy under former Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, in the race to succeed Mayor Michael Bloomberg at City Hall.

“Progressive change is the centerpiece of Bill de Blasio’s vision for New York City, and it’s why he will be a great mayor of America’s largest city,” Obama said in a statement distributed by the de Blasio campaign.

Obama cited de Blasio’s plan to increase taxes on the city’s highest earners to expand access to pre-kindergarten programs and efforts to prevent the closure of community hospitals as “bold, courageous ideas that address the great challenges of our time.”

A small taste of Bill de Blasio’s background:

Today’s New York Times features an in-depth look at the radical background of Bill de Blasio, the man poised to become the next mayor of New York.

De Blasio is a longtime admirer and supporter of Nicaragua’s Marxist Sandinistas. He helped raise funds for the Sandinistas in the 1980s, subscribed to the party’s newspaper, Barricadda (Barricade), and unlike many others, remained supportive even after the Sandinistas lost power. To this day de Blasio speaks admiringly of the Sandinistas (while offering some token criticism of their handling of dissent), and remains interested in the Latin American left. De Blasio honeymooned in Cuba, in violation of the U.S. travel ban.

Asked about his goals for society at a meeting in 1990, de Blasio “said he was an advocate of ‘democratic socialism’”. Today he describes himself as “progressive,” yet also characterizes his views, in the eighties and today, as a mix of admiration for European social democratic movements, Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal, and liberation theology.

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